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20121202
20121210
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 17
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English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> woodruff: we have a battleground dispatch from a coastal city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this
a high-profile misconduct lawsuit involving a group of cops known as the riders. now city leaders are hoping a last-minute tentative deal will avoid a federal takeover of the department. matthai kuruvila, i know you've been covering this story. what are the details of this settlement and what does it mean for the department? >> well, what this agreement involves is an agreement between the police union, the city and professors attorneys who filed this original civil rights lawsuit. what they've decided on is creating a compliance director. now, this would be a quasi mayor of oakland in a sense in that he gets to -- he or she would have the power to fire the police chief with the court approval. they would have the power to direct the city administrators. those are two things currently only the mayor has. it's limited in scope in that it would only effect the reform tasks that are incomplete for the police department. the city had been very concerned that this potential receiver, or federal receiver, would have oversight over the entire police department. so all -- so all three sid
news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not unique to citi; it's industry- wide. a financial industry runs into huge problems. it happened in the '30s, and it happened in the last five years. when you go through these periods, you go through a lot of change. that industry is now trying to figure out what is the right size of the industry. >> reporter: still, economists say citi's action today is not the start of a new wave of mass layoffs across corporate america. the nation's job market may not be robust, but it's not frozen, either. in fact, today, the payroll firm a.d.p. reported 118,000 new private sector jobs w
owning a newspaper and radio and tv stations in the same big city. thus he would give the massive media companies free rein to devour more of the competition. the chairman is julius genachowski, appointed to the job by president barack obama. now, the fcc tried to pull this same stunt under a republica chairman back in the second term of george w. bush, but at hearings held around the country an angry public fought back. >> we told you a year ago when you came to seattle that media consolidation is a patently bad idea. no "ifs," "ands," or "buts" about it. so with all due respect i ask you, what part of that didn't you understand? >> i'm a republican and i'm a capitalist, but some areas of our private sector must be regulated. freedom of information is too important, we must be oactive in protecting that fundamental freedom. >> if the fcc is here wanting to know if chicago's residents are being wewell served, the answers no. if local talent is being covered, the answer is no. if community issues are being treated sensitively, the answer is no. if minority groups are getting the coverage
jobs are in consumer banking. the move comes less than two months since a shakeup at citi ousting former c.e.o., vikram pandit. he was succeeded by michael corbat. the bank nearly collapsed during the crisis and ultimately received bailouts totaling $45 billion, money that citi has since repaid. roben farzhad has long watched the changes at citi for bloomberg "businessweek" and joins us again tonight. roben, welcome. today we heard that stocks soared on the news of these layoffs. what does that tell us about what was going on at citi? >> it's sad, actually. citigroup is know-- you could say the financial crisis is over but in the throes of an existential crisis. it doesn't know what it wants to be. investors have been clamoring for a while for citigroup to simplify, to shed payrolls, to be good at something. it does everything, but it isn't market leading, necessarily, in any one category. and by and large, they got the layoffs, at least the beginning round of layoffs that they wanted today. >> ifill: we know many of these layoffs are noin the u.s., but i assume part of the relati
of the most visited holiday landmarks in the city. and tom, the big board's tree is embroiled in a twitter battle for bragging rights as the city's best with another famous tree, the one at rockefeller center.. >> on my way to work this morning, i saw the tree by the new york stock exchange, and it looks pretty impressive. >> tom: we saw you putting ornaments on it. but the trees are tweeting? is that right? >> susie: not quite right, and those trees are a little too high for me to reach to put an ornament. that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, december 4. have a great evening, everyone, and you, too, tom. >> tom: good night, susie. we'll see you online at nbr.com, and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
, cities stripped. at night, the sea, barbaric bellows stifled, sprawls outside the window, framed like a dark, unruly landscape. behind us is a darker kind of dark: i watch your eyes for signals. the music makes a pause for prophecy: 'tomorrow, off-shore breezes and warmth to each other's warmth,' we do not listen." >> that was how long ago? >> 1968. >> you had been married -- >> we had been married 18 years, at that point. >> how does love change from then to now? >> it's more profound and more essential. it was very strong right from the beginning. we met on the first day of french class at northwestern university in 1946. and we've been together ever since. >> she became a playwright, didn't she? >> she was a playwright. and her plays have been produced about 60 times in mostly new york and los angeles. and i appreciate her work on my poetry and other things i write. she is a wonderful critic. four years ago, she had a stroke. and that kind of put an end to her writing. so that was a very sad thrust. >> i'm curious as to this poem, "this year's valentine." where did that come from?
staff for their own safety. those who remain will be restricted to the capital city, damascus. separately, the u.s. voiced mounting concern about activity at syrian government sites storing chemical weapons. this afternoon, president obama warned syrian leader bashar al- assad not to cross that line. oday i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences. and you will be held accountable. >> sreenivasan: in response, syria's government released a statement saying it would never use chemical weapons on its own people. the regime has never confirmed it has such weapons. there were warnings about greater curbs on the internet, as the world's nations gathered today for a summit on telecommunications. the 11-day conference in dubai is the first such review since 1988, well before the web was fully formed. the u.s. has raised concerns that china, russia, and others will seek new limits on
to stay clear. fighting near the airport and around the capital city has intensified in the past week. the latest amateur video showed street battles and a car set afire by a rocket attack. the exiled leader of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for the first time. it was, in part, a show of defiance after the militant group's latest clash with israel. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: he crossed the border from egypt with tears in his eyes. the leader of hamas setting foot on palestinian territory for the first time in 37 years. he had never been to gaza in his life but after kissing the tarmac apparently sobbing as he did so khaled meshaal said gaza had always been in his heart. there to greet him were the al qassam brigades. named after an arab rebel leader killed by the british in the 1930s. 80 years on the fight for self- rule isn't over. and thousands turned out to watch meshaal's cavalcade crawl through gaza city just days after a war with israel which left around 160 palestinians dead. >> the second was when i was
york city's lincoln center, ford introduced the new lincoln mkz sedan, one of four luxury, and fuel efficient models coming out over the next four years. >> no one offers a car that's more fuel he fishant than the this hybrid no one offers a vehicle with the kind of craftsmanship and beautifully skimp find interior that we val. and when you drive it, it's going to be as fun to drive as a bmw but as quiet and comfortable at a lexus. >> susie: this is ford's latest campaign to stage a comeback for lincoln. when i talked to the c.e.o. alan mall ally i asked him if this is his last push to save the brand. >> we haven't focused on lincoln over the last few years because we had these other luxury brands. i think this is almost a beginning because now everybody knows that what ford did with ford, and now they all know ford is going to be 100% laser focused on lincoln. >> susie: when people think of a luxury car they think mercedes, bmw, not a lincoln. so how are you going to compete against those upscale brands? >> less than ten years ago lincoln was the number one luxury brand in the unit
that cities have announced 11,000 job cuts, is this the beginning of a trend, mark. >> no, susie, i don't think so. if washington can reasonably address the fiscal issues and i'm still confident that they will ultimately get it together. there will be a fair amount of -- but at the end of the day they'll get it together. if they're able to do that when we get into next spring, i do think we're going into much better shape. businesses will get it back and certainly investor will be happy about that. by this time next year i think we should see a much better job market because the housing whichs already starting to turn should be in full swing. so no, i don't think businesses are going to pull back. the only reason they would is if washington completely because this. at this point i don't think that's going to happen. >> susie: how do you think the federal reserve is going to read in today's jobs report. they're meeting on tuesday as you know. do you think it's going to trigger any new response from the fed? >> well, as you know the fed's on high alert. they've got their foot to the acce
's like building a brick wall around a city and protecting it against an enemy. it's excellent protection against something entering our community that could cause illness. >> narrator: very strong herd community could completely eradicate many vaccine- preventable diseases, rendering vaccines unnecessary. this happened with smallpox in the 1970s. a decade ago, the world health organization had plans to eradicate polio, followed by measles, but vaccine scares around the world served to chip away at herd immunity, pushing these goals into the future. >> many of these germs belong to us only, which means if we can make enough humans immune simultaneously, we could eradicate them. and then, yes, we could stop vaccinating. there was actually a campaign hoping to eradicate polio from planet earth, as we did small pox, and notice we're not vaccinating anymore for smallpox because it's gone. but at the moment, at least, while they're in the world, there still is the potential for outbreaks if people are willing to stop vaccinating prematurely. >> narrator: why is it so hard for some americans to
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)